What is a Literary Canon? (with pictures)

 

the canon literature

Canon as distinguishing between original works and later additions. In literature, the term "canon" is used to distinguish between the original works of a writer who created certain characters and/or settings, and the later works of other writers who took up the same characters or setting. In fiction and literature, the canon is the collection of works considered representative of a period or genre. The collected works of William Shakespeare, for instance, would be part of the canon of western literature, since his writing and writing style has had a significant impact on . However, canon is a literary rule that is used to evaluate books and writings against certain models, such as plays are evaluated against Oedipus the King by Sophocles, where Oedipus the King is a yardstick which has set canons for plays. Examples of Canon from Literature.


Popular Literary Canon Books


In fictioncanon is the material accepted as officially part of the story in the fictional universe of that story. It is often contrasted with, or used as the basis for, works of fan fiction. The alternative terms mythologytimelineuniverse and continuity are often used, with the first of these being used especially to refer to a richly detailed fictional canon requiring a large degree of suspension of disbelief e.

Other times, the word can mean "to be acknowledged by the creator s ". Influential or widely accepted fan theories may be referred as " fanon ", a portmanteau of fan and canon. Alternatively, the term "headcanon" is used to describe a fan's own interpretation of a fictional universe, the canon literature. The use of the word "canon" originated in reference to a set of texts derives from Biblical canonthe set of books regarded as scriptureas contrasted with non-canonical Apocrypha.

The term "canon" nowadays refers to all works of fiction within a franchise's fictional universe which are considered "to have actually happened" within the fictional universe they belong to, the canon literature. When there are multiple "official" works or original media, the question of what is canonical can be unclear.

This is resolved either by explicitly excluding certain media from the status of canon as in the case of Star The canon literature and Star Warsby assigning different levels of canonicity to different media as was in the case of Star Wars before the franchise was purchased by Disneyby considering different but licensed media treatments official and equally canonical to the series timeline within their own continuities universe, the canon literature, but not across them, or not resolved at all, the canon literature.

The use of canon is of particular importance with regard to reboots or re-imaginings of established franchises, such as the Star Trek remakebecause of the ways in which it influences the viewer experience. The official Star Trek website describes Star Trek canon as "the events that take place within the episodes and movies" referring to the live-action television series and filmswith Star Trek: The Animated Series having long existed in a nebulous gray area of canonicity.

The Star The canon literature canon originally existed on several levels, the canon literature. The highest level was the original Star Wars films, and statements by George Lucas ; tie-in fiction from the Star Wars expanded universe had a different level of canonicity. All subsequent material exists on the same level of canon, with the Lucasfilm Story Group being established to ensure no contradictions among canon works.

The makers of Doctor Who have generally avoided making pronouncements about canonicity, with Russell T Davies explaining that he does not think about the concept for the Doctor Who television series or its spin-offs. For example, the canon literature, the canon of Sherlock Holmes consists of the 56 short stories and four novels written by Sir The canon literature Conan Doyle and featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes.

Fan fiction is almost never regarded as canonical. However, certain ideas may become influential or widely accepted within fan communities, who refer to such ideas as "fanon", a portmanteau of fan and canon. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Redirected from Canon literature. Concept of continuity between different fictional works. This article is about the concept of a canon that defines the world of a particular series or franchise. For influential works of fiction, see Western canon. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Learn how and when to remove these template messages. This article needs additional citations for verification, the canon literature.

Please help the canon literature this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. This article possibly contains original research.

Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed, the canon literature. October The canon literature how and when to remove this template the canon literature. CBS Studios. Retrieved 29 April Retrieved 30 April The Final Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Edited by Peter Haining. Vox media. Retrieved 5 June Categories : Canons fiction Continuity fiction introductions.

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The Literary Canon

 

the canon literature

 

Canon as distinguishing between original works and later additions. In literature, the term "canon" is used to distinguish between the original works of a writer who created certain characters and/or settings, and the later works of other writers who took up the same characters or setting. In fiction and literature, the canon is the collection of works considered representative of a period or genre. The collected works of William Shakespeare, for instance, would be part of the canon of western literature, since his writing and writing style has had a significant impact on . Anyone who has studied literature in a secondary school or university in the western world knows what that means. It means that the works in the canon get read, read by neophyte students and supposedly expert teachers. It also means that to read these privileged works is a privilege and a sign of privilege.